Tag : Brix Media Co Vancouver

Will Virtual Reality Be the Next Battleground For Consumer Marketing?

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One of the biggest shifts in technology this year has come with the release of several major virtual reality platforms. Oculus Rift, HTC Vive and PlayStation VR are some of the high-end products to recently hit shelves, while lower end rigs like Google’s announced Daydream VR and Samsung Gear VR offer cheap entry points for interested consumers.

With this influx of opportunity, VR has begun to blur the lines between the digital world and the real. Developers aren’t the only ones hard at work discovering the potential of this new technology, so are marketers. Even in its infancy, VR already presents an opportunity that no previous generation in history had the chance to explore; Full immersion.

Think of how consumer products have been marketed to date; Beautiful photography, catchy tag lines and dynamic video all created to draw the attention of the consumer. But what if you could bring the entire experience direct to their own living room?

Virtual reality offers a form of communication and connection that no other medium can express. Imagine a retail brand being able to offer customers to not only shop online but also physically see the way those clothes fit through a virtual reality changing room. Or how about a travel company promoting the newest five-star hotel in Paris with a VR tour of the estate? Consumers could even test drive a new Audi on the famous Monaco circuit all from the comfort of their own couch. The opportunity of VR ushers society to the next generation of brand awareness.

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Creative Ways VR Is Being Implemented

At these early stages, we are only beginning to scratch the surface of possibility for VR experiences. Fortunately, there are some who have taken the risk of early adoption and are trailblazing with new concepts to promote their services. Destination BC became the first destination marketing organization in North America who used VR to launch The Wild Within VR Experience. People from anywhere in the world could experience the beauty of British Columbia in an interactive setting from salmon fishing to viewing the Rocky Mountains in all of their glory. VR continually proves that we can push the boundaries of what we originally thought possible.

An Effective Tool For Discovering Consumer Habits

We’re in the early stages of seeing how consumers react to this new tech. Only time will tell how effective this immersive visual medium will increase conversion rates. Vancouver-based Cognitive VR is a company that understands metrics will be valuable in the coming years in determining effective VR advertising. The company has created software that follows eye movement for capturing interest focal points and A/B testing for virtual ads. This provides significant data into how, if at all, virtual advertisements are being consumed. Knowing what draws people’s attention will help tailor content to increase effectiveness.

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It’s Certainly Not For Everyone, Yet

By now, it may seem like VR is the next wave of consumer engagement but it’s important to understand that with any new technology will come challenges. Like any new platform, VR is relatively untested and a foreign concept not only to consumers but also businesses. It also has yet to reach a market penetration that would be considered substantial, this will surely grow as VR develops but for now, it’s a small audience for an arguably high price tag. App development can be difficult, expensive and hard to implement, and it will take brands with high-risk tolerance or deep pockets to move in  early on. However, there is a prime opportunity right now for brands to establish themselves as innovators and forge into the unknown. These brands will not only benefit from being one of the first to market, but also learn from their own successes and failures, making them far better positioned to engage with a growing audience as VR penetrates households to the extent previous innovations like radio and TV have before.

4 Tips to Build a Logo That Will Leave an Impression

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There are varying opinions as to what determines a successful logo design. Some believe all logos should be simple and iconic like Apple, McDonald’s and FedEx – where intricacies are kept to a minimum in order to achieve a bold and timeless look. Others prefer typographic logos that highlight the company’s name such as Google, or illustrative logos that tell a story about the business like Starbucks. Regardless of aesthetic preferences most can agree, the core function of a logo is to stimulate brand awareness and maximize marketing potential.

These 4 tips will help create a logo with a lasting impact

1. Invest
First, determine the budget you’re working with. Investing in a logo is one of the most important first steps of brand development. Prices can range from $200 to upwards of $200,000. Factors that impact the price such as project requirements, timeline and agency experience. Like any design element, logos are not a commodity. The value of a memorable trademark cannot be calculated by how many hours it takes to create it. While emerging contest and freelance bidding websites like 99designs and Designhill may seem attractive to new business owners, a logo design with an inexpensive price tag may have repercussions. By using these sites you are at risk of engaging with inexperienced artists, receiving little or no communication and even plagiarism. Be sure to choose a designer who will work closely with you and encourage useful feedback.

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2. Detailed brief
Developing an effective design brief is critical in ensuring a successful outcome. A brief is a document outlining business objectives and corresponding design strategies. It gets the creative juices flowing and helps the designer think strategically about design solutions. Design briefs can take on various forms but should always include a summary of the project, project goals, target audience, project specifications and timeline.

3. Don’t underestimate the power of color
When thinking about a logo for your business, it is important to take into account the way people interpret color. The use of color can bring multiple layers of meaning, from primitive responses based on millions of years of evolved instinct to associations we make based on personal experiences. Psychologists have studied how people are affected by color and found there is a strong correlation between color and emotional response, therefore it is closely tied to how a brand is understood. For example, restaurants like Pizza Hut, KFC and Tim Horton’s use red in their logos to stimulate hunger. Black, white, silver and gold are often used in the logos of luxury brands like Prada and Michael Kors to enhance the feeling of sophistication.

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Piccolo is a strong example of incorporating color into branding. As a children’s design company, the bright texture appeals to our visual senses encouraging creativity. Brighter hues stimulate feelings of energy and evoke a strong response or reaction.

4. Give useful feedback
Your designer may actually present a logo that is close to what you’re looking for, but there are often revisions needed. It’s up to you to communicate your needs and provide the designer with specific feedback that is useful. Instead of saying, “I don’t like any of them,” try to articulate what you’d like to see more of and have some examples of what you do like. Offer clear direction without taking over. If you have found a designer that you feel understands your needs, you can be confident he or she will present you with quality work.

cringeworthy mistakes of business CEOS PR oil spill

The Five Most Cringeworthy Mistakes Your CEO Could Make

THE WAY YOUR COMPANY HANDLES A MISHAP CAN EITHER LEAD TO A BLIP ON THE MEDIA’S RADAR OR A TOTAL CRASH-AND-BURN OF THE COMPANY’S BRAND. HERE’S HOW TO AVOID THE LATTER.

BY JENNIFER MALONEY

Five Most Cringeworthy Mistakes Your CEO Could Make

Four years ago, Tony Hayward, then CEO of international oil conglomerate British Petroleum was deemed the most hated man in America.

Following the aftermath of BP’s oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, he told reporters he anticipated the overall environmental impact to be “very, very modest.”  . . .